Are you a fan of the show 'Pawn Stars'...or even one of the spinoff shows that involve pawning?

I am. It's not a favorite of mine, but I do occasionally find myself watching the show to see if anyone is bringing in anything of value that I might have packed away in a box in the attic. One day I'll get my act together and rummage through all the old junk hoping to find a gem.  When I do, I'll be sure to keep this in mind.

Here are five items sure to give you a good payback at the pawn shop (as per Rick Harrison, owner of the Gold and Silver Pawn Shop in Las Vegas):

Flickr.com- user baseball collection

1. Baseball Cards - What guy doesn't have a ton of these in a shoebox somewhere (or did mom throw them out years ago)? Common cards/mass produced cards are not going to fetch a lot of money, but old originals of legends (Ruth, Mays, Mantle), rookie cards, etc. etc. will make you some dough.  The cards also have to be in "mint" or "excellent" condition.

 

 

 

 

Flickr.com user- justgrimes

2. Comic Books - I have a few, but nothing that I would imagine would make me any loot.  Though I do have an unopened "Superman" comic book where he dies.  Maybe that's worth something.  Anyways, here's the criteria for making cash on a comic book: 1. Age 2. The print number 3. Number of copies in print  4. Condition of the book!

 

 

 

 

Flickr.com- user HARRY NG

3. Zippo Lighters - You can flick your BIC, but your BIC won't pay you back.  Zippos will!  If it's from the 1950s, it could be worth thousands.  Ones that are worth the most are from 1932 -- that's when the company started.

 

 

 

 

Flickr.com- user Jenn Durfey

4. Old Jewelry - Dig through all of Auntie Karen or Gramma Sara's old jewelry, because it could be worth some money.  Why let it sit in a box and collect dust....cash it in. Sometimes that ugly jewelry left over from generations is actually made out of gold and can have high value.  Gold sells every time.

 

 

 

 

Flickr.com-user --stardreamer_to_vensre

5. Classic Antique Clocks - These babies pay off. The older the better, but they better work.  In order to make good cash the clock must A) work  B) have a nice design  C) be made by a well-known clockmaker D) be mechanically complex.  If your clock meets those standards, maybe it's "time" to trade it in and get paid!