Gas prices continue to drop across New York State, but a bigger change could be coming as soon as tomorrow.

As of September 15th, gasoline producers and gas stations are allowed to switch from the summer blend of gasoline to the winter blend which costs less to produce and should lead to a drop in the price per gallon.

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The drop in price can vary, but over the past several years, we have seen a drop between 10-30 cents per gallon according to Gasbuddy.com.

WHAT IS WINTER BLEND GASOLINE?

Gasoline producers are allowed to switch to a winter blend of gas starting on September 15th. This blend has a higher combustion rate allowing it to ignite easier in colder temperatures. To allow for a quicker and higher combustion rate, fewer additives are used to make the gas which makes it less expensive to produce and less expensive to sell. The winter blend of gas is usually available for sale between September 15th and April 30th.

WHEN CAN I EXPECT TO SEE A DROP IN PRICE?

It usually takes a couple of weeks for the winter blend of gas to be moved to local gas stations and most gas stations won't start selling the winter blend of gas until their current summer blend of gas is gone. This could take a couple of days or a couple of weeks. Usually, the biggest drop in the gas price comes at the end of September through the beginning of October.

The good news is that we have seen the average price of a gallon of gas already drop to below $4 per gallon and with this switch over to the winter blend of gas, we could see the price drop to levels we haven't seen in months.

 

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.

High Gas Prices Might Be Good For New York

Gas prices continue to rise to unprecedented levels across the country, and while most people are right to think that is a very bad thing, there could be some good news when it comes to higher gas prices. 

 

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